The Link Foundry for July 31, 2012

Another month passed like a locomotive with a red-hot boiler.  Great Caesar’s Ghost!  What’s a mere mortal to do?  How about pass on a few links?  Okay!

Steampunk

This particularly stunning piece features working gears and a Swarovski crystal, no less.  A bit showy for me, but I’m sure you know someone….

And you could examine your new ring under this very cool lamp, most of which looks like it was purchased from your local hardware store.  Hmmm…get thee behind me, new project!

Can’t fault the design in this Tumblr, and the song is aces.  Boba Fett on a dragon, though, I don’t know about that.  I kinda like other peoples’ characters the way they are.

Lots of questions about this new game “Dishonored”.  Is it steampunk or isn’t it?  You make the call.  It’s got some of the more familiar and/or cliched aspects of steampunk (goggles, steam engines), but you’ll find a lot more in there than that.  I like the idea, and it seems to be ahead of its time, since there’s no real agreed-upon definition of steampunk yet.  My answer to the above question?  It is steampunk and very much appreciated.

Dieselpunk

Our lone dieselpunk entry this week is this gallery from The Dieselpunks Encyclopedia.  It’s something I hadn’t thought of, but it works.

Now, before any of you start stacking wood around posts for a marshmallow/blogger roast because I’ve sullied your favorite genre, have a quick listen.  My view of most genres is that the keystone of the genre, the aspect on which the genre critically depends, is societal.  That provides the basic foundation for interaction between the different characters and gives frames of reference to latch onto.  You can have just about anything else in it, so long as the societal structure for the actual historical time is basically, reasonably intact.  For steampunk, it’s Victorian society, monarchic, class-critical, very poor at the bottom, very wealthy at the top.  For dieselpunk, it’s between the World Wars in America, gangsters and molls, flappers and zoots trying to dance and drink away the horror of the trenches and forestall the horrors to come.  For clockpunk, er, um, I don’t know that one.  Since man has known how to use springs as an energy source to power gears for decades (centuries? millenia?), you could set your project just about anytime.  I’ve seen it most often in a Victorian setting, but that’s not a hard and fast rule.

Where do you think the line lies between these genres or is there a line?  Let me know in the comments.  Thanks for reading!

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s